Publications

2015
Research Report/Policy Brief

Community colleges are at a crossroads. Pressure is mounting to increase enrollment and improve retention. At the same time, there are millions of adults who would benefit from a college education, but who lack a high school degree. Bridge programs provide a solution that will serve these adults, improve college enrollment and retention numbers, and even generate revenue for colleges.

2015
Fact Sheet
This worksheet is a companion to the policy brief, Good for Students, Good for Colleges: Investing in Bridge Programs as a Strategy for Success to allow colleges to calculate their projected return on investment for implementing bridge programs.
2015
Fact Sheet
Community colleges are facing pressure to increase retention and completion rates. Enrollments and funding are declining. This fact sheet shows how bridge programs can be a strategy for success for both colleges and students.
2015
Fact Sheet

What is a bridge program? This fact sheet explains what bridge programs are, and how Women Employed is leading the effort to implement bridge programs in Illinois and nationwide, giving thousands of workers the skills and credentials they need to move from low-paid, low-opportunity jobs into high-demand careers that offer financial stability.

2014
Research Report/Policy Brief

In this policy agenda, the Pathways to Careers Network calls on Illinois’ incoming governor to incorporate career pathways into the state’s education and workforce systems, and to invest in programs that will ensure low-skilled adults have access to and can succeed in proven education and training programs.

2011
Program Guide/Curriculum

A toolkit to help bridge programs assess current provision of key transition services and plan for improvements.

2007
Research Report/Policy Brief

This policy brief gives a brief overview and description of bridge programs, which provide a path into education and training for adults with low literacy and math skills.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 1 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide provides basic information on bridge programs, including, including identification of various program models and how these programs increase access to better career paths.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 2 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide provides information on developing a bridge program, including how to design the program and curriculum, how to build employer relationships, an dhow to place students in jobs and college.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 3 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide providing information on budgeting and funding a bridge program.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 4 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide provides information on staffing, promoting, recruiting for, and marketing a bridge program.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 5 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide helps practitioners to evaluate and improve their bridge programs.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 6 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide describes statewide bridge program implementation efforts in Washington, Kentucky, Ohio, and Arkansas.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

Chapter 7 of the 125-page  "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide profiles successful bridge programs from across the country.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

The Foreword and Table of Contents for the 125-page "Bridges to Careers for Low-Skilled Adults" program development guide.

2005
Program Guide/Curriculum

This 125-page guide provides concrete guidance on how to develop and implement "bridge programs," which help adult students improve their basic skills and succeed in college. The guide contains information and interactive worksheets that program developers and managers can use to help with program design, curriculum development, funding, implementation, and evaluation. Download the entire guide above or smaller sections.

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